An arts camp, with the future in mind.

I took thousands of pictures while I was in India on the Fulbright. I carried my camera around with me wherever I went. The one time where I ran out of memory and battery power was the time I spent at the arts camp in Kuppam at the Agastya Foundation. I wanted to record everything I witnessed all the days I was there. The Kanavu Pattarai arts camp was something I wasn’t sure I was going to experience. Fortunately, I did. The experience was something that I will never forget.

This particular Kanavu Pattarai camp is supported by collaboration between the NalandaWay Foundation and the Agastya Foundation. NalandaWay provides the teachers, the curriculum, the resources, and Agastya Foundation provides the space. The camp pulls from near by towns. Both boys and girls, ages 13-16, attended this camp. It was not a residential experience but a day camp for 3 full days.

The first day students were introduced to each other and jumped right in on camp activities. The teachers organized the whole camp, and when there was some spots that needed an activity I filled in with yoga and a quick lesson in making origami cranes. I also participated in a trust exercise, which was really fun for all of us.

All the students were extremely excited to participate. They made a large amount of art in just three days, and presented on topics that were important to them and their school community. It just goes to show you, that when students are given a chance to perform, act, interact, create, make, design, and do—THEY WILL! Most of the students were really into the arts projects and produced a lot of amazing work together.

Collaboration is a big piece of the puzzle for this kind of camp, especially since the goal is to build a community of peers. One of the best parts of the camp for me was when the students were tasked with creating a group song. It was a huge challenge. Many students were very happy doing visual arts, or even making posters, and speaking. BUT singing? That was a big leap for some of them. Many of the students didn’t know what to do, or how they should attempt that particular task. However, there were a few girls who would not give up. While the group took a break from song writing, a couple of girls stayed back to finish the melody and lyrics. They were the only ones in the building, and I don’t think they were even aware that I was paying attention. What I saw was true collaboration, respect for one another, and the desire to come together to accomplish the task. These girls continued working on the song until everyone came back in the room. They shared their lyrics and taught the whole group of students the melody of the song. The other students were amazed, excited and couldn’t wait to be a part of the musical task once again.

As a group they practiced (led by the girls and a few other boys). The way the girls problem solved and helped their fellow peers was amazing. They reached out as a team to put something together that would bring a lot of joy to everyone in the whole entire room.

On a whole, this group exhibited a wide variety of talents and problem solving skills. I thought that this was a strength because they all had a particular way to exhibit that strength. It made the group of 30 kids extremely strong.   Students exhibited a lot of empathy and compassion for each other. Most times when one member of their group was having difficulty another would job in and say,” Maybe we try this?” The students always seemed like they were looking for ways to solve problems, think creatively, use the set limitations to their advantage, think outside the box to use limited art materials in a new way, and most importantly not give up on the project or each other. Only a few students really needed some extra help, but I think it was only because they had never had this much going on at once. Not much exposure to arts, not much exposure to group work and collaboration.

The Kanavu Pattarai camp is much more than a few days for kids to get away from school and have fun. This program is creating ways for kids to build their self-esteem, gain leaderships skills, practice problem solving, and be more self- aware. Without the arts, students are unable to see some the values that already exist within themselves. By providing arts camps, NalandaWay is essentially strengthening the school communities. The students who participate in these camps take everything back with them and share it at their school. They are able to talk about their experiences and show what they accomplished by participating in the camp.

 

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The camp space.
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Student receiving a welcome pin!

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Camp rules.
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Students creating their small group poster.
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Student beginning work on her self portrait with a tiny mirror.
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Decorative self portraits.  Using color and pattern as symbols.
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Students had a lot of discussions with each other for collaborative projects.

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Working on their community poster, discussing issues that are important to them and their community.

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Presenting their community posters to all the other groups.

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Me!  Teaching origami cranes, step by step.

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Uma and I on a tour around Agastya.
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All the camp goers and the teachers.
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The lovely girls who put the song together.
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Traveling to the camp spot.

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Shadow puppets to tell a story.
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Clay figures.

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Trust game– “Crazy taxi”.

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I was delighted to collaborate with NalandaWay on this program. I was able to expand the camp to five days, and add additional components like yoga and mindfulness. The more time we spend providing meaningful programs for youth to connect to each other and their own communities, the stronger we build the future for all of us.

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A peak at what’s around

I had the chance to visit the Kanavu Pattarai camp in Andhra Pradesh.  I was mostly in the very southern tip of that state where Tamil Nadu and Kerala come together.  First we traveled by train, and toured around in a car until we got to Kuppam.  That is where the camp was held.  The landscape was very similar to the southwest.  Dry, arid, blue skies, and puffy clouds.  It felt like a very familiar place.  I loved the Southwest when I lived there, and I really got used to being in this type of environment again.  If felt so familiar.

It was the perfect setting for the camp.  Very quiet, serene, beautiful.  Rambling vistas everywhere to just stare at, and take a very deep breath.  I think students would have no problem feeling inspired to create in this space.  In the morning and evenings it was quite cool.  However, just as you may have guessed, the day time was hot.  You really had to keep up your fluids up here, or else, heat exhaustion.  I loved visiting the Agastya Foundation and staying on their campus for those few days.  It was a great break from the traffic, humidity and people-packed city.  It would have been great to see more of the State itself, but I was happy I got to see  this small corner.

 

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The conductor of the train, wearing  nice jacket, but what you don’t see is the clipboard.  It had a very colorful cartoon character, and a unicorn on it!
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AC.
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Trains fill up fast, sometimes it was standing room only.  Not to mention 3 people to one long bench.
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Everyone has there hustle.  There are people selling everything: toys, jewelry, games, food, snacks, tea.  You name it, you can probably get it.
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Part of one of the schools we visited on our way to Agastya.
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Streets are far less busy here than Chennai.
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Trucks, palms, and mountains.
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Watching the sunset, was lovely.
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Small town we passed through to get to Agastya.  We had some tea and chips.

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We drove far away from the towns and villages to a huge plot of land that is the campus of Agastya Foundation.  We crossed over this big water body and we realized there was a full moon. 
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Outside of our dorm they are building a shrine to Agastya.
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After breakfast we walked the road to the art camp building.
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View from art camp.

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Another view from Art Camp.

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Typical South Indian Cuisine! That big spot is for the rice!
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You can tell it’s hot.

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View from camp.

Spontaneous Performance

When I visited this school, I had no idea that these students were so apt to show their talents.  The students were so eager to show off their dance moves and singing.  We had a whole evening of pre-dinner performances. Many of the students improvised and made up percussion with the objects around them.  These two kids were really quite amazing.  It just goes to show you, that no matter what your background is, your circumstances, art transforms the space.  On first glance many of us may look at the state of the classroom and think nothing can be accomplished in a grey, uninspired room.  Sometimes it just takes a single action to transform the space.  The students who shared their talents that evening made the environment warm, joyful, exciting, and playful.

Road trip to Camp

The major highlight of being involved with NalandaWay Foundation was being able to attend, observe and help facilitate an arts camp called Kanavu Pattarai (dream workshop).  The purpose of the camp is to immerse youth in community building strategies. By using arts based and mindfulness practices, Kanavu Pattarai camps educate and train diverse communities to create responsible children who are expressive and positive in their choices.

Before we arrived at the camp for this session, our group stopped along to visit some other groups at some different schools who had already experienced Kanavu Pattarai in previous sessions.  The kids had recalled what they learned, shared with us the art and skits they created during camp.  I even got to facilitate some group yoga practices.  What a treat!

The best part for me was being able to interact with the kids, and noticing how receptive they were to my presence and trusting me to guide them through some poses.  What a warm reception and some stand out, unforgettable moments.

Here is a glimpse of some of the students I met, the schools I visited, and what they shared with us:

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Students were game for a few yoga poses.  Tree pose is always a good one to try.
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In Andhra Pradesh, the land is a lot drier and rockier.
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Mural painting is big everywhere you go, although this one is fades, it’s still beautiful.
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I had a chance to visit a girls school, the whole school was bright, cheerful, and boasted lots of arts integration.
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Meeting with a group of girls who participated in a previous camp.
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We also visited a residential school.  These kids were energetic, lively, and so friendly.
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Listening carefully to a few members who were speaking about the importance of the arts, but also how the arts can be a catalyst for social improvement among peers.

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Part of the camp process is to create a banner to bring back to the school.  This group worked hard to create a message about equality and acceptance.

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More to come from this trip. Stay tuned.

Job Satisfaction

You never know what kind of driver will pick you up when you use Ola.  Most are not very talkative, but others talk your ear off, or ask you copious amounts of questions.  Many are truly just focused on getting the customer from point “A” to point “B”, no matter what.  This driver is one of my favorites.  He seemed really happy when he picked me up. Greeted me with a nice smile and turned on the meter quickly and without question.  On this day, the traffic was light, there was slight breeze, and everything seemed right about the world.

I was busy looking at my phone to follow along on google maps when I noticed his whistling.  It made me so happy.  At first I just listened, but then I felt the urge to capture his the joy he shared with me.  I hope you smile.

Yep, more Kerala

It was definitely a nice retreat to stay in Kerala for a few days.  It was extremely cool, quiet, and fresh.  We had great meals everyday, and had a very leisurely time.  We played games, ate food, walked around and basically felt like we were taken care of.  The quietness can be shocking after being in the city for a time.  I was used to the city traffic and constant hum.  However, once you refocus your senses to listen to the natural settings of the babbling brook, the bird calls, the monkey knocking at your door (really, they did), you then begin to feel like yourself again.

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This dancer was one of the employees of the hotel.  She performed twice while we were there.  Her expression and movement we amazingly controlled.
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South Indian dance tells traditional stories.  All of the performers I saw when I was in India had studied this particular kind of dance as children.
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The monkey knocking on the door.  You  MUST lock your door at all times, or they will come in.
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Just waiting.

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We took an evening walk through the old tea farms.  Such a peaceful place and nice vantage points.

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Before we leave, one last photo.

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Don’t know the name of this game, but we played it.  Made our own rules too.
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Daily treats and tea time.  Yum!

Kerala and the camera

As I keep going through my pictures for this blog, I realize that I’m really only half way through.  I took so many pictures, probably too many.  But it was all in an effort to remember, and even feel what it was like to be there.  Let’s face it, I am a visual person.  I like looking at things.  I definitely remember telling myself to stop taking pictures and to just be in the moment and to pay attention to the present.  That’s really hard for me when there’s so much to look at.  I guess that is a failure of technology, in a sense.  We can use it to remember things for us, when we should actually be remembering the time we spent doing, being, and living.  I do love taking pictures, but I also know it’s important to step away from the camera lens, to just let whatever happens, happen.  I love that I can capture moments, or observe something in a different way with a camera.  That’s exactly it’s job, because even then, you can alter what others see.  Your first edit is deciding what you are taking a picture of.  I don’t alter my photos much, I usually just leave them the way they are. That is also giving that environment, that moment, that object, that person a particular point of view.  These pictures are a view of what I saw, what I wanted to remember, but it’s definitely not the way it was or is.

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We could have opted for the tree house experience, but had a villa instead.  Maybe next time?
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One morning Charlene and I went for a nature walk with a naturalist.  It was all up hill, foggy, and humid.
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Our guide, as we lag behind– or are taking pictures.
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Fog was slowly lifting, but it wasn’t very clear that morning.

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Later that day we went to a nearby lake,  it was very reminiscent of Burke Lake in Virginia.  A place where people go for a walk, rent a canoe, and picnic.

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Emerging from the mud.

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These blossoms were all over the place.  I have no idea what they’re called.  I nicknamed them “fraggle flowers”.  Obviously.

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The old playground is still used by children (and adults).  This monkey looks a little concerned.

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On the way back from the Lake, we stopped along one of the view points.  The view was foggy at best, but we were definitely a long way up.
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The boy and his family were so sweet. He wanted to make sure we knew that he knew English.  They asked if we could take photos with them, and then I asked them the same.

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Seriously, Burke Lake?? or India?

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Kerala

The long awaited break came when a friend visited me from her teaching post in China.  She came to Chennai and then we took the bus to and from Pondicherry.  After that, we flew to Kerala.  We didn’t do the typical trip of going on a river house boat, or going down south.  We went for the cool air, the breeze, and to coexist with the beautiful green forest way up on the mountains.  There we took a few hikes, a yoga class, chatted, had a massage played games, and watched some cultural performances.  Maybe it was just what we needed to get a way from the hustle and bustle of the cities both of us had been living in.  One thing for sure, is that I want to get back to Kerala and experience all the other amazing historical offerings and more of the beautiful landscape that makes up this huge state.  The food was good, the people were welcoming, and the air was fresh.

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After we landed, it was quite  a journey to make it up the mountain.  We went from desert, through palms and into jungle.

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Masonry– everywhere.  There’s nothing like stacked stone walls.  I love the craftsmanship.
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I never was never tired of the tall palms.
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Finally up in tea and coffee farms!

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Our hotel villa had a lovely stained glass window that separated the sleeping area from the sitting area.
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High ceilings, a sitting area outside to hear the brook behind the property, and no air conditioning.  We actually didn’t need it.
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Bridges were everywhere on the property, taking us to meals, the pool, the game room and spa treatments.

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Tiled roofs of villas.  The traditional Kerala tile, which helps maintain a nice temperature for the whole place.
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An interesting abstracted map of Vythiri.
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Hello friend.  They were everywhere, more pictures to come showcasing the animals, flora and fauna.
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We were headed up there! Way up there, even beyond up there.
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A view from one of the 9 hairpin turns on the way up.  Can you see the elephant?
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Unfortunately with beauty comes waste.  Always a duality in this country.

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More Pondicherry

After looking at this blog, you might think that I actually lived in Pondicherry for 4 months. Well, that wasn’t the case, but I did visit more than the average tourist.  Mostly because it was close and I visited some lovely friends often.  And of course, anyone who came to visit me, also came to Pondy.  Here are a few more pictures from around the sleepy colonial part of town and a little bit to and from the beach.  There was so much art on every corner, and also random, unexplained things, like: lectures,  decorated auto rickshaws, and signs that I didn’t know the meaning of.  I loved the quirkiness of the place and would go back to visit anytime.

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Ain’t nobody got time to follow that rule.  The road is understood by it’s honking.
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There aren’t too many decorated autos in south India, but this one was a real treat.  It belonged to a local orphanage.
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Mystery lurks around every corner in Pondy- no one knows what one might find.
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My friend and I walked around and ran into them setting all of these chairs up in a middle of the road.  Then hours later, when we were walking back a full on presentation and lecture was taking place under the banyan tree.  About what?  I do not know.
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Old school.
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Out and about in Pondy.
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Urban mixes with the country side, bringing graffiti to all the areas.
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Fishing nets.
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Palm roof.
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View from the What’s Up? Cafe at Serenity Beach.
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Don’t forget! 
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A little statue in a hotel room.
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There is a street that is constantly lined with motorcycles.  I decided to play around with the view from the mirrors.

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More fishing nets, I watched them pull fish out of these delicate next for a while one day.  It really takes a lot of people to fish with nets like that.  I can’t even begin to think how hard it must be to untangle, repair, and handle that kind of netting.
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In search of a wife?  Here’s how to find one and how to be one.  This book scares me.
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Are the methods easy?  I dunno.  You’ll have to try!!!!

me

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Darn parental units, always cursing our lives like that.
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Gandhi Statue in Pondicherry.
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A lot of these trucks are seen in and around Rajasthan, I actually hadn’t seen a lot of decorated trucks in Chennai. This one was a beauty.
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Typical.
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I wonder what they’re honest about?

c

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They do try.
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Waiting for a ride.
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In south India temples are everywhere.  Even next to tv service repair shops and window replacement stores.
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Part of a Banyan tree in Auroville.
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Leg room? On a bus?  How did that happen?
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You know me and maps.  This one is made of metal.

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Goats.
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Dogs resting in holes in the ground, because it might be cooler?
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Girls on their way to school.
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Staircase to nowhere.
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Deity in a tree.

Oh the cafes

If I was feeling homesick, or had hankering for some western food, there was no where better than visiting a nice cafe, sitting outside or being around art and greenery.  It was a nice treat, and one I always looked forward to.  One of the best things was things about these western style cafes is that they would make the best dish they could make.  You want a waffle?  You got the best waffle.  You want a granola with your fruit bowl?  You got the best granola someone could make.  You want a creamy pasta dish?  You can get a creamy pasta dish, with homemade pasta.  All of the cafes had something special and tasty to eat, no matter what it was.  If it was on the menu, that means they were good at making it.  Here are a few pictures of a few cafes I frequented in four months.

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Fried momos from a Tibetan restaurant.
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I went to this particular cafe weekly…for the insanely good coffee, extremely consistent wifi, and impeccable service.
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The best fruit salad in the world.
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A cool beverage to sooth the palette on a very hot day.
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Dosa reign supreme in this part of the world.
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Another Tibetan restaurant. I just can’t say no to momos
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An artful cafe.
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Seriously, have you seen a bathroom door that looked like this?
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Just a lovely coffee.
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Ambience.
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Greenery.
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Someone upped their game on art and advertising. 
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But no matter what, you can’t beat a freshly made tea or coffee from your neighborhood tea walla
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The crispiness of this dosa.
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Some cafe’s like to have a theme.  There was no “bier” in this biergarten, however.
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A lunch of delicious snacks.
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Sometimes you just want some spicy tomato soup and naan.
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Beautiful flowers surround you at this cafe.
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Marble tables ready to be filled with some food and drink.